Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Episode 2: The Killer Cards

Show Notes for Episode 2:

  • “Poker and the Written Word” by Tim Peters

    'Shut Up and Deal' by Jesse May (1998)Tim discusses Jesse May’s 1998 novel Shut Up and Deal. As Tim explains, May is also known for having been “The Voice of Poker” on the British TV show Late Night Poker (1999-2002). In fact, during the first season of the show May hosted the show as Mickey Dane, the name of the central character in Shut Up and Deal.

    Along the way, Tim mentions a couple of other poker novels: Rick Bennet’s King of a Small World (1995) (which he recommends) & Richard Jessup’s The Cincinnati Kid (1963). (I wrote about Jessup’s novel early last year.)

    For those interested in some other poker novels, Tim also provides the following list of titles (no particular recommendations intended, here): Tap City by Ron Abell (1985); Broke: A Poker Novel by Brandon Adams (2008); Lucky at Cards by Lawrence Block (2007); The Rebuy by Burto Deluchi (2007); The Prop by Pete Hautman (2006); Texas Poker Wisdom by Johnny Hughes (2007); Dead Money: A No Limit Poker Mystery by Rudy Stegemoeller (2007); Deadman's Bluff (2006) & Deadman's Poker (2006) by James Swain; The Picasso Flop (2007) by Vince Van Patten & Robert J. Randisi; and The Perfect Play (2005) (called The Big Blind in the U.K.) by Louise Wener.

    You can read Tim’s reviews for CardPlayer along with other writings at his website, “The Literature of Poker.”

  • “Who Played Poker With Pocahontas When John Smith Went Away?” (1919) sung by Fanny Watson
    (Sam M. Lewis / Joe Young / Fred Ahlert)

    From the musical Monte Cristo Jr. Here are the lyrics (again, as well as I can make ’em out):

    Looking through my history
    I find a little mystery
    About a certain dame.

    How did little Pocahontas
    Take John Smith for all his wampus?
    There! I know her game!

    He taught her how to play poker --
    She sent him home without his dough.
    But every time that John came back
    He found her with a larger stack.
    Here’s what I’d like to know . . .

    Now, who played poker with Pocahontas when John Smith went away?
    She always dressed up so pretty.
    Somebody must have spent the kitty.
    She wore a bluff just like every Indian that led John astray.

    Johnny’s pipe of peace goes out the day he quit.
    When he came home he found his piece of pipe was lit.
    Now, who played poker with Pocahontas when John Smith went away?

    Fanny WatsonNow, who played poker with Pocahontas when John Smith went away?
    She always dressed up so pretty.
    Somebody must have set the kitty.
    She wore a bluff just like every Indian that led John astray.

    He called on her one cold night in an awful storm.
    She had no coat but still he kept her always warm.
    Now, who played poker with Pocahontas when John Smith went away?

  • “Tales from the Tables” by Bob Woolley
    (a.k.a. Rakewell, the Poker Grump)


    Stupid ThingsThe “Poker Grump” returns with a list of stupid things players say at the tables, in particular focusing on a couple of categories: "Compliments" & "Clichés."

    You can read more of Bob’s tales -- of both the grumpy and non-grumpy varieties -- over at his blog, Poker Grump.

  • “The Killer Cards,” The New Adventures of Nero Wolfe
    (originally aired January 12, 1951)


    'The New Adventures of Nero WolfeStarring Sydney Greenstreet (Wolfe) and Gerald Mohr (Archie Goodwin). Also starring Betty Lou Gerson, Jay Novello, Howard McNear, Barney Phillips, and Bill Johnston. Hosted by Don Stanley.

    Here is the Wikipedia entry on the show (in all of its versions), and here are links to other episodes of The New Adventures of Nero Wolfe (the Greenstreet version).

    You can leave comments and/or suggestions here on this post, or send them to shamus at hardboiledpoker dot com.

    Also, you can now subscribe to the show in iTunes!

  • Tuesday, April 1, 2008

    Episode 1: Dead Man’s Deal

    The Hard-Boiled Poker Radio ShowGood golly, Miss Molly. A podcast. What in the hell am I thinking? Thanks a lot for checking it out. With each new episode, I will be adding a post over here containing show notes. I’ll also always give a heads-up over on Hard-Boiled Poker when a new show has been posted.

    You can click here to listen over the intertubes, or just right-click the link and choose “Save As” to download. The RSS feed for subscribing to the show is http://feeds.feedburner.com/hardboiledpokerradioshow. I am not sure at the moment whether the show is going to turn up in iTunes right away or later or what. I do know if you enter that feed into other podcast-receiver programs like Juice (which I use), you’ll receive the show there directly.

    Here are the show notes for Episode 1:

  • “Poker and the Written Word” by Tim Peters

    'The Biggest Game in Town' by Al Alvarez (1983)Tim discusses one of the most heralded of all poker narratives, The Biggest Game in Town (1983) by Al Alvarez. As Tim points out, Alvarez’s account of the 1981 World Series of Poker is a must read for poker players. About a year ago, I posted a list of all of the professional players mentioned in the book.

    You can read Tim’s reviews for CardPlayer along with other writings at his website, “The Literature of Poker.”


  • “The Darktown Poker Club” (1914) sung by Bert Williams
    (Jean Havez / William H. Vodery / Bert Williams)

    Here are the lyrics to the song (as far as I can make them out):

    Bert WilliamsBill Jackson was a poor old dub.
    He joined the Darktown Poker Club
    Then cussed the day they told him that he could join.

    His money seemed like it had wings.
    If he held Queens, someone had Kings.
    Each night he would contribute all his coin.

    He says “I think I’ll play 'em tight tonight --
    No bobtail flush’ll make me bite --
    When I go in, my hand’ll be a peach.”

    So he saw he was in with the losing pile
    And got kinda peevish after while.
    One night he got up and made a speech.

    He says “You see this brand new razor?
    I had it sharpened just today.
    And I want to tell y’all some new rules to follow hereafter
    When we play.

    Keep your hands above the table when you're dealing -- please.
    And I don’t want to catch no aces down between your knees.
    Don't be makin’ funny signs or tip your hand
    And I don’t wanna hear no kind of language that I don’t understand.

    Stop dealing from the bottom, ’cause it looks so rough,
    And remember that in poker five cards is enough!
    When you bet, put up, ’cause I don't like it when you shy.
    And when yo’ broke, get up, and then come on back by and by.

    Pass the cards to me to shuffle every time before you deal
    Then there’s anything wrong, why, I’ll see.
    Not gonna play this game no more according to Mr. Hoyle --
    Hereafter, it’s gonna be according to me!”

    'The Darktown Poker Club' by Bert Williams (1914)Now seated right there in the clan
    There chanced to be a one-eyed man --
    Bill watched him from the corner of his eye.

    The one-eyed man would deal and then
    Would cost Bill Jackson five or ten.
    Finally, he got up with a sigh.

    “Ah,” he says, “I think it’s a shame,
    But there’s cheating goin’ on in the game
    And honestly I - I don’t wanna name the guy.

    But where I may not call his name
    If I catch him cheating just once again
    I’m gonna take my fist and close his other eye!

    Pass them cards to me to shuffle every time before you deal
    There’s anything wrong, why, I’ll see.
    We ain’t gonna play this game no more according to Mr. Hoyle,
    Hereafter, it’s just according to me!”

  • “Tales from the Tables” by Bob Woolley
    (a.k.a. Rakewell, the Poker Grump)


    Here the “Poker Grump” describes a phenomenon with which we’re all familiar, though perhaps wish we weren’t. The article he mentions is from the February 2007 issue of Bluff Magazine -- it is titled “Dirty Vegas.”

    You can read more of Bob’s tales -- of both the grumpy and non-grumpy varieties -- over at his blog, Poker Grump.

  • “Dead Man’s Deal,” Inner Sanctum Mysteries
    (originally aired August 28, 1945)


    Raymond Edward Johnson, host of Inner Sanctum MysteriesThe episode was written by Emile C. Tepperman and directed by Himan Brown. Larry Haines stars as Joe Lester. Raymond Edward Johnson hosts the show, aided by Mary Bennett (the Lipton Tea lady).

    Here is the Wikipedia entry on the show, and here are links to other episodes of Inner Sanctum Mysteries.

    You can leave comments and/or suggestions here on this post, or send them to shamus at hardboiledpoker dot com.

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